9Apr 2015
Apr 9, 2015

What is ‘legally drunk’ in Connecticut?

In Connecticut, drivers under the age of 21 years are considered to be legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is more than .02, for non-commercial drivers above 21 years, they are considered to be legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is more than .08. However, for commercial vehicle drivers, they are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is more than.04. Just like in most states, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.

Connecticut Drunk Driving Penalties

For first time DUI offenders in Connecticut, they face a prison sentence of up to six months and they must pay a fine of $500 to $1,000. However, imprisonment can be suspended and a period of probation imposed to the offender, while under the probation time the offender must perform 100 hours of community service work. The suspension period for the offender’s driver’s license is 45 days. However, the offender must use an ignition interlock device for every car he/she drives for a period of one year.

Second time offenders convicted within  10 years of the previous offense face a prison term of up to two years, the offender must serve at least 120 days, the offender must also pay a fine of $1,000 to $4,000. A period of probation is also compulsory. As a condition, during probation the offender must perform 100 hours of community service work. The suspension period for the offender’s driver’s license is either one year followed by two years with an ignition interlock device or three years.

Drivers convicted three or more times within ten years of a prior conviction face a prison term of up to three years, and one year of the sentence must be served. In addition, the offender must pay a fine of $2,000 to $8,000. A period of probation is also mandatory and the offender must perform 100 hours of community service work during probation. It is important to note that, on the third conviction, the offender’s driver’s license will be permanently revoked.

The Point System in Connecticut

Every time you are convicted of a moving violation, the Department of Motor Vehicles issues points to your driving record. If you accumulate too many points over a specific period of time you risk your license being suspended. If you get 6 points on your driving record, expect a warning letter from the DMV. The points in your driving record remain in effect for two years after the date of assessment.